Category: Artist

The End and The Beginning

FullSizeRender 20London, England —”It’s been a long time, I shouldn’t have left you without a dope beat to step to (step to, step to, step to)…”

Instead of apologizing for an unintended hiatus (wack), I’m just going to jump in and explain what I’ve been doing these past couple of months.

In May, the last leg of my journey was at a ceramics studio in Tolne, Denmark. I worked with people from all over the world to build a wood fired kiln from the bottom up.

In June, I returned to New York City just long enough to move my stuff out of my apartment and into a storage unit. Why? you ask.

Well, I am back in the U.K.

For the next several months, I will be in London working on a research project while also doing an apprenticeship in Dorset, England with a potter. My primary goals for the apprenticeship include experimenting with wheel throwing and sculptural forms, learning about kiln building and firing and mastering glazes. It’s a tall order for only a few months but with my laser-like obsessive compulsive tendencies and penchant for repetition, I fully expect to have improved leaps and bounds by the new year.

I will continue to update the blog with what I’m working on, including news about exciting projects (well, I think they’re exciting).

In short, while I thought this was the end of my trip, it’s actually just the beginning.

Getting a Second Wind

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London, England—It’s 12:38am. I’m sitting in Heathrow Airport, camping out overnight for an early morning flight (which is always fun). After almost a month, I’m leaving London. I didn’t expect that it would be over a month before I posted an update, but here we are.

I was never one to pine for London. Ever. I mean, I had nothing against the city. To be honest, it just seemed…well, boring. Probably because the extent of my knowledge of English culture was limited at best.

Well, I can admit when I’m wrong. It’s a lively city, and there’s a lot to see beyond the typical tourist sites. One of my favorite things is that many of the art museums are free, not to mention the art in public places. During my commute one day, I noticed some beautiful mosaics on the subway walls of Tottenham Court Station. When I got home and did a little research and learned that they were created by Eduardo Paolozzi in the ’80s and were removed a couple of years ago (recently back on display.)

They are really beautiful and you have to see them if you visit London. I think sometimes we miss beautiful things because they’re out of the context which we expect. These murals are not in a museum. Rather, they are the backdrop for crowds of people hurriedly going from point A to point B. I don’t even know how I noticed them when I did. I had been to that station several times before but didn’t see them.

Being in London has been a respite of sorts, probably because there isn’t the language barrier that I’ve experienced in other countries. Yeah, there’s the occasional confusion because of different accents and British slang, but for the most part I understand fully when communicating, navigating, planning…it’s wonderful. When I first arrived a few weeks ago, I was so relieved to be able to understand people that I didn’t realize how taxing it was on my brain to be in places where I don’t speak the language. It made me think about how isolating and exhausting it must be for people who don’t speak English to navigate the U.S.

The beauty of being in one place for an extended period of time is that I’m able to have a more consistent and predictable schedule. The longer I travel, that doesn’t get any less important. I work throughout the day, with intermittent breaks for wandering. I’m learning how important it is to actually build in time in my schedule for daydreaming, wandering, having time where my brain isn’t being occupied by any specific demands. I’ve had some great insights while taking breaks from my work and just walking around.

One of my favorite things was searching for traditional English tea cups for a friend. I thought the search would be easy but it took me a bit longer than expected. After asking around, I found Camden Market, a kind of touristy spot. I first went to an antiques shop and the owner sent me to a place that sells, almost exclusively, tea sets!

Being surrounded by so many different designs gave me an appreciation for the artistry and history of the English tea culture. Also, the owner of the store was so knowledgeable, I became even more fascinated.

And so, I’m leaving London. It seems like I’ve only been here a short while. I guess a month really is a short while relatively speaking. I didn’t see the typical tourist stuff like Big Ben and I resolved that I’m totally fine with that. There’s always next time.

Artist In Progress

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Color study sketch. Watercolor on paper.

I spend a lot of time reading, writing, listening to podcasts and audiobooks. When I’m in the studio, podcasts and audiobooks are my go-to because I can listen while working.

On my commute this week, I listened to a book about creativity by a professor in the Architecture department at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). She presented some interesting ideas about how creativity develops and how we engage in creative work

Chapter 6, ‘Perceiving and Conceiving’ was especially interesting as I examine the importance of drawing as a foundation for other work. It’s a critical skill that I believe is useful for everyone, not just artists.

If you’re interested in learning how to draw or improve your drawing skills, check out the book by Betty Edwards, Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. It’s been around for years and it still holds up.

Drawing is all about observing. I’m trying to improve my drawing skills, which means I draw something everyday. It’s forcing me to be more focused and attentive to what I see.

Artists in Paris

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A student describing his art work.

Paris, France—”Paris is always a good idea.” Sabrina forgot to add, “unless it’s winter.” My arrival to Europe from Africa was several weeks ahead of schedule. My plan was to be in Africa until at least March, which would have put me in Europe at the beginning of spring…when it’s warm. Well, that was the plan.

This is my second time in Paris. I did all of the touristy things during my first visit a few years ago, so I don’t feel like I’m missing anything. I’m trying to maximize my time here while I have a private workspace. I’ve been in France for a few weeks and everything is going well.

The best part is that I have an office space to myself with a door that I can close (I didn’t realize how much I had missed having my own space). It’s nice to be back on a regimented schedule. I wake up, have breakfast, go to my workspace and work all day. Each day is different, but at the beginning of the week, I establish what my goals are, what I need to get done and each day I work toward those goals. I try to incorporate room for variety and flexibility. This week it proved especially beneficial.

I was able to sit in on a university visual arts class. I never tire of hearing artists talk about their work and creative process. This scenario was a little different because everyone spoke French but it was engaging, nonetheless. The basis of the course is personal creativity. The students create work on their own and each week they meet to present and discuss their work. It reminded me of critiques I had in undergrad, except there was a wide range of disciplines represented in the class. On the day that I visited, students presented: painting, installation, performance art, public art rendering, a literature reading. It was compelling to hear (through a student translator) how these young artists are thinking about creating and their own identity.

Color Studies in Cape Town

Cape Town, South Africa—Happy New Year!

After two long days of traveling from Tokyo, I finally landed in Cape Town on New Year’s Day. I ‘celebrated’ on a flight from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia to Cape Town, and by ‘celebrate’ I mean I had a nightmare that the plane was plummeting from the sky. Ah, fun times. It took me a couple of days to get acclimated but I’m back on schedule and excited about being in Cape Town for a bit. The weather is lovely, there is a lot to see and they have a vibrant arts scene. For a relatively young place, there is a lot of critical history that will be fun to explore from the inside.

I have been creating small pieces as color studies for larger works when I get back to my studio in New York. How is the essence of a place captured in color? This is one of the questions I’m asking as I conduct these studies. Color plays an integral role in how we perceive ideas, our memory and is tied to emotional and psychological experiences. Being intentional about color is important to me because it helps me to be effective in how I guide the design.

Artist Interview: Denise Milan

São Paulo, Brazil—Denise Milan is a multidisciplinary artist from Brazil whose work has been exhibited internationally. She graciously agreed to meet with me in her São Paulo studio to talk about her creative process and her evolution as an artist.

Here is a snippet from our conversation:

MG: How has your work evolved since you started and now?

DM: Well, in the beginning, I was more naive, eh? It was drawing the sunset, little ducks. It didn’t have a real connection or it didn’t have a message. But I felt I could interpret some things and I enjoyed making art because that gave me a sense of concentrating in another way towards whatever I was interested in that moment and that in a way kind of separated me from the day to day life.  Sure I loved the day to day life, but I also loved to dive inside penetrating my own curiosity.

 

My Traveling Studio

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I had to be picky about selecting materials for my ‘traveling studio’. The sole criterion was  low-maintenance. It was a tough decision and I’m not even sure what I’ll create with these things, but here’s what I brought:

1) Moleskine Volant Notebooks

2) Watercolor palette

3) Watercolor brush

4) Color pencils

5) Woodless graphite pencils

6) Drafting compass

7) Watercolor paint

8) Pencil sharpener

9) Portable paper cutters

10) Mixed media sketchbook