Tag: Design

On Seeing the Real Thing

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Athens, Greece—Whenever I’m able to see a historic site as I travel to a new city, I try to make it a priority—even though they’re usually teeming with tourists. Greece was no exception. On my second day in the country, I visited the Acropolis in Athens. The Parthenon was the most memorable structure (mainly because it’s the one that I remember most from Humanities classes in school).

I like to see art/architecture in person for many reasons. It helps me to understand the creative process, and the context in which it was created. When art is presented out of context—in a textbook, for instance—there’s a danger that it will just become an abstract idea (like the Parthenon was to me before last week). Being in the environment sparked questions about the culture, religion, politics, and daily life in ancient Greece which led me to trace the design/function problems that artists potentially faced with their creative process.

My theory is that understanding the context in which art is created can also help one to understand its culture/perspective.

So if ever you’re able to see art and/or architecture in its original context, you should definitely consider it. It could potentially help you to solve problems in your own work.

 

Getting a Second Wind

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London, England—It’s 12:38am. I’m sitting in Heathrow Airport, camping out overnight for an early morning flight (which is always fun). After almost a month, I’m leaving London. I didn’t expect that it would be over a month before I posted an update, but here we are.

I was never one to pine for London. Ever. I mean, I had nothing against the city. To be honest, it just seemed…well, boring. Probably because the extent of my knowledge of English culture was limited at best.

Well, I can admit when I’m wrong. It’s a lively city, and there’s a lot to see beyond the typical tourist sites. One of my favorite things is that many of the art museums are free, not to mention the art in public places. During my commute one day, I noticed some beautiful mosaics on the subway walls of Tottenham Court Station. When I got home and did a little research and learned that they were created by Eduardo Paolozzi in the ’80s and were removed a couple of years ago (recently back on display.)

They are really beautiful and you have to see them if you visit London. I think sometimes we miss beautiful things because they’re out of the context which we expect. These murals are not in a museum. Rather, they are the backdrop for crowds of people hurriedly going from point A to point B. I don’t even know how I noticed them when I did. I had been to that station several times before but didn’t see them.

Being in London has been a respite of sorts, probably because there isn’t the language barrier that I’ve experienced in other countries. Yeah, there’s the occasional confusion because of different accents and British slang, but for the most part I understand fully when communicating, navigating, planning…it’s wonderful. When I first arrived a few weeks ago, I was so relieved to be able to understand people that I didn’t realize how taxing it was on my brain to be in places where I don’t speak the language. It made me think about how isolating and exhausting it must be for people who don’t speak English to navigate the U.S.

The beauty of being in one place for an extended period of time is that I’m able to have a more consistent and predictable schedule. The longer I travel, that doesn’t get any less important. I work throughout the day, with intermittent breaks for wandering. I’m learning how important it is to actually build in time in my schedule for daydreaming, wandering, having time where my brain isn’t being occupied by any specific demands. I’ve had some great insights while taking breaks from my work and just walking around.

One of my favorite things was searching for traditional English tea cups for a friend. I thought the search would be easy but it took me a bit longer than expected. After asking around, I found Camden Market, a kind of touristy spot. I first went to an antiques shop and the owner sent me to a place that sells, almost exclusively, tea sets!

Being surrounded by so many different designs gave me an appreciation for the artistry and history of the English tea culture. Also, the owner of the store was so knowledgeable, I became even more fascinated.

And so, I’m leaving London. It seems like I’ve only been here a short while. I guess a month really is a short while relatively speaking. I didn’t see the typical tourist stuff like Big Ben and I resolved that I’m totally fine with that. There’s always next time.

Artist In Progress

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Color study sketch. Watercolor on paper.

I spend a lot of time reading, writing, listening to podcasts and audiobooks. When I’m in the studio, podcasts and audiobooks are my go-to because I can listen while working.

On my commute this week, I listened to a book about creativity by a professor in the Architecture department at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). She presented some interesting ideas about how creativity develops and how we engage in creative work

Chapter 6, ‘Perceiving and Conceiving’ was especially interesting as I examine the importance of drawing as a foundation for other work. It’s a critical skill that I believe is useful for everyone, not just artists.

If you’re interested in learning how to draw or improve your drawing skills, check out the book by Betty Edwards, Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. It’s been around for years and it still holds up.

Drawing is all about observing. I’m trying to improve my drawing skills, which means I draw something everyday. It’s forcing me to be more focused and attentive to what I see.

Color Studies in Cape Town

Cape Town, South Africa—Happy New Year!

After two long days of traveling from Tokyo, I finally landed in Cape Town on New Year’s Day. I ‘celebrated’ on a flight from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia to Cape Town, and by ‘celebrate’ I mean I had a nightmare that the plane was plummeting from the sky. Ah, fun times. It took me a couple of days to get acclimated but I’m back on schedule and excited about being in Cape Town for a bit. The weather is lovely, there is a lot to see and they have a vibrant arts scene. For a relatively young place, there is a lot of critical history that will be fun to explore from the inside.

I have been creating small pieces as color studies for larger works when I get back to my studio in New York. How is the essence of a place captured in color? This is one of the questions I’m asking as I conduct these studies. Color plays an integral role in how we perceive ideas, our memory and is tied to emotional and psychological experiences. Being intentional about color is important to me because it helps me to be effective in how I guide the design.